Post-Traumatic Whiteness: How Vietnam Veterans Became the Basis for a New White Identity Politics

Post-Traumatic Whiteness: How Vietnam Veterans Became the Basis for a New White Identity Politics IN MARCH 1982, after months of heated negotiations among veterans groups, officials, and donors, a construction crew broke ground on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. The sloping black granite walls may never have been built if not for the deft politicking of […]

The Other Side: Radical Women

The Other Side: Radical Women Featured Image: Radical Women, Installation view, Sin Titulo (Untitled), 1970, by Gloria Gómez-Sánchez Banner Image: Installation view, Radical Women at the Hammer Museum, foreground, Popsicles by Gloria Camiruaga; background, works by Sonia Gutiérrez ¤ THE FIRST THING you see when you enter the space of the exhibition Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985 at the Hammer Museum […]

The McPhee Method

The McPhee Method ONE WAY to get closer to something is by way of distinctions — by considering what that thing could be but is not. I have in mind the buzzword mansplainer, and I’m hoping to use it to get a bead on the writing of John McPhee. The mansplainer as we all know […]

A Life in One Day

A Life in One Day HOW BEST to capture life in writing? “Is life identical with time in its unavoidable but mysterious passage?” the German writer Christa Wolf asks in the introduction to her 2007 book, One Day a Year. “While I write this sentence, time passes; simultaneously a tiny piece of my life comes […]

Will It Ever Be Sunday?

Will It Ever Be Sunday? IN A 1972 LETTER, Hannah Arendt speculates that a thinker has only one real thought in her life, everything else being nothing but variations on this single theme. First published in French in 2014, A Long Saturday is a short book of conversations between George Steiner and the journalist Laure […]

A Miserable Miracle

A Miserable Miracle EARLY IN Lucrecia Martel’s new film, Zama, we are introduced to a wretched and sickly man, a prisoner of the Spanish colonial government at Asunción. The prisoner’s sentence is abruptly waived. Upon learning of his freedom, he falls to the ground, suffers a troubling bronchial spasm, and begins to describe a fish. […]